Ceiling fan recalls

Over the years many popular ceiling fan manufacturers have produced defective products. In many cases these are quality fans with one problematic small part. Here we offer a comprehensive list of known recalls. If you think there is a possibility your fan may be affected, contact us. We will help you determine if your fan is an issue, and if so, what is the best course of action.
 
Casablanca Ceiling Fans: Fans made between 1981 and 1993 may have a defective mounting, which could possibly cause the fan to fall from the ceiling. Casablanca offers a free kit to upgrade the mounting safely.

Emerson Ceiling Fans: Fans made between 1984 and 1989 were offered with an optional "close mount" kit for mounting the fan on a lower ceiling. These kits have a defective mounting, which could possibly cause the fan to fall from the ceiling. Emerson fans were also sold by Sears.
Fanimation Ceiling Fans: Fans made between 2000 and 2002 may have a defective mounting, which could possibly cause the fan to fall from the ceiling. Affected models include the Islander, Louvre, and Tropicana. Fanimation offers a free kit to upgrade the mounting safely.

Nutone "Paddle fans": Fans made between 1983 and 1984 may have a defective mounting, which could possibly cause the fan to fall from the ceiling. Affected models include the Veranda, Sea Island, Hacienda, and Slimline. Also very early Veranda models use a "friction drive" motor arrangement that could stall out and overheat. These models were only produced 1979-1980 and were not recalled.

Homestead: Fans made in the early and mid 80s were reported to have a defective hanger bracket, which could possibly cause the fan to fall from the ceiling. Homestead has been out of business since the early 90s and very little information is available.

Aire Tek Ceiling Fans: These designer fans have two smaller fans on either end of a rotating assembly. Fans made in 2002 may possibly allow electrical parts to become exposed risking electric shock. This fans were made by Vaxcel International and were also sold at Menards stores under the name "Turn of the Century". Vaxcel will provide a free placement to those with recalled fans.

Sears Ceiling Fans: Fans featuring "Smurfs" and "Snoopy", made between 1984 and 1985, may have a defective mounting, which could possibly cause the fan to fall from the ceiling. Note: The same (recalled) fans were also sold at Lindsey stores.

Bay Breeze Ceiling Fans: Fans made between 1989 and 1990 may have faulty blade brackets which could cause the blades to separate from the motor assembly while operating. These fans were sold at Builder's Square.

Hunter Ceiling Fans: Fans made between 1993 and 1994 were offered with an optional wireless remote control kit. It is possible that one could receive a shock from the antenna of said kit. Affected models include 22788. Hunter will replace the remote kits free of charge.

Tara/Southern Fan Co Ceiling Fans: Fans made between 1979 and 1989 have a plastic motor flange which may break and cause the fan to fall from the ceiling. Also the fans' rubber flywheel may break causing the fan blades to fall from the ceiling. Southern Fan has been out of business since 1989 and limited information is available.

Additionally . . .

Rubber flywheels:

Many ceiling fans use a rubber flywheel to mount the blades to the motor and isolate vibration. Earlier designs of these flywheels were more prone to breaking than others. When a flywheel breaks, the blades detach from the motor and are at risk of falling. However in most cases the fan's switch housing and/or light assembly catches the blades and so, rather than dropping many feet to the floor, they only drop a few inches.

There are some exceptions including the "Tara" fan mentioned above. Fans with flywheels prone to breaking include: Tara/Southern Fan, Homestead, Robbins & Myers, Quoitzel, and Sierra. See our 'flywheel replacement information' page for more information. I am not aware of any formal recalls regarding flywheels, most of the companies dealing with these problems are long out of business.

Doc #43

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